27 June 2021. 13th Sunday Ordinary time. Cycle B-2021. Wisdom 1:13-15; 2:23-24 + 2Corinthians 8:7, 9, 13-15 + Mark 5:21-43.

Because God did not make death, nor does He rejoice in the destruction of the living. For He fashioned all things that they might have being, and the creatures of the world are wholesome … For God formed us to be imperishable; the image of His own nature He formed us. But by the envy of the devil, death entered the world, and they who are allied with him experience it (Wis 1:13, 2:23-24).

When a tragedy turns more into a blessing rather than a malady, people would say “it is a blessing in disguise.”

A high-speed chase between police and a suspect hit a third car and it rolled over. The innocent driver survived but he was disabled. He sued the police, and got a lofty $7,000 a month lifetime compensation, more than what he would have sweated out working. Typically observers comment, “It’s a blessing in disguise.”

A traveler missed his flight, and slumped exasperated cursing those people and incidents that got into his way. His fury turned to solace when he learned that that plane he missed crashed killing all those who made it aboard. He missed death by a few minutes. Is this also “a blessing in disguise?”

A tourist who was bumped off a reservation in a first class hotel in downtown furiously settled for a third class hotel in the suburbs. He breathed a sigh of relief when an ensuing earthquake collapsed the hotel that shut him out, missing getting buried under the rubble. Would that be “a blessing in disguise” too?

Jesus loved Mary, Martha and Lazarus, and when Lazarus was ill, they summoned Jesus for help. When the Miraculous Healer heard this, He tarried, saying, “This illness is not to end in death, but is for the glory of God, so that the Son of God may be glorified through it.” The illness did end in death, but Jesus raised Lazarus back to life, amazing a crowd of witnesses, including those who did not believe in Him (cf. John 11; https://brieflections.com/2020/03/29/crisis-in-christ/)

God does not give misfortune, for He is all good and everything He does is good. But the devil is continuously working to thwart His plans, and to tempt His creatures to turn against Him.

On the other hand, if the unfortunate reflects deep enough, he might find out that his errors and neglects contributed to bring misfortune to himself. Aberrations lead to misfortune, and God allows many of them to go the way they should go—to misfortune.

If God intervenes to save the sinner from the folly of his ways, He is exercising his “love” option. He uses the misfortune to turn people back to Him. He rights up a wrong that was bound to effect a malady.

All things work for good who are called according to his purpose” (Romans 8:28).

The Lord made everything for his own ends, even the wicked for the evil day” (Proverbs 16:4). VSS

Picture credit: ClipArtMag.com